Eid ul-Fitr 2014: A celebration at the end of Ramadan (PHOTO ESSAY)

28 07 2014

CENTRAL-EUROPEAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM INSTITUTE WISHES ‘EID MUBARAK’ TO ALL MUSLIM BELIEVERS

 

One of the most joyous days in the Islamic calendar, Eid al-Fitr, also known as Eid ul-Fitr or Eid, is a celebration that marks the end of Ramadan (a holy month of fasting observed by Muslims). This year Eid al-Fitr will most likely be observed on Monday, July 28. It is celebrated on the first day of Shawwal, the 10th month of the Islamic lunar calendar. Traditionally, the observance begins with the sighting of the new moon.

To mark the beginning of Eid and in accordance with the Sunnah, or practices of the Prophet Muhammad, many Muslims wake up early in the morning and pray Salat ul-Fajr, or the pre-dawn prayer. After brushing their teeth, taking a bath and wearing perfume, they have breakfast before heading off to perform special congregational prayers known as Salaat al-Eid. Many Muslims recite the takbir, a declaration of faith, on the way to the prayer ground and give special charitable contributions known as Zakat al-Fitr.

Eid al-Fitr is a day of great merriment and thanksgiving. Muslims celebrate by gathering with friends and family, preparing sweet delicacies, wearing new clothes, giving each other gifts and putting up lights and other decorations in their homes. A common greeting during this holiday is Eid Mubarak, which means, “Have a blessed Eid!”  Here, we round up some of the best photos of Eid 2014 celebrations across the globe.

A Palestinian vendor offers balloons for sale at the market in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, Sunday, July 27, 2014. During normal times, families in Gaza would be busy now with preparations for Eid al-Fitr, the three-day holiday marking the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Traditionally, children get new clothes, shoes and haircuts, and families visit each other. In the outdoor market, vendors set up stands with clothes and shoes, but said business was slow. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

A Palestinian vendor offers balloons for sale at the market in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, Sunday, July 27, 2014. During normal times, families in Gaza would be busy now with preparations for Eid al-Fitr, the three-day holiday marking the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Traditionally, children get new clothes, shoes and haircuts, and families visit each other. In the outdoor market, vendors set up stands with clothes and shoes, but said business was slow. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

A Palestinian vendor plays with balloons at the market in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, Sunday, July 27, 2014. During normal times, families in Gaza would be busy now with preparations for Eid al-Fitr, the three-day holiday marking the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Traditionally, children get new clothes, shoes and haircuts, and families visit each other. In the outdoor market, vendors set up stands with clothes and shoes, but said business was slow. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

A Palestinian vendor plays with balloons at the market in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, Sunday, July 27, 2014. During normal times, families in Gaza would be busy now with preparations for Eid al-Fitr, the three-day holiday marking the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Traditionally, children get new clothes, shoes and haircuts, and families visit each other. In the outdoor market, vendors set up stands with clothes and shoes, but said business was slow. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

A Yemeni woman, center, shops in preparation for the upcoming Eid al-Fitr festival, at a market in the old city of Sanaa, Yemen, Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

A Yemeni woman, center, shops in preparation for the upcoming Eid al-Fitr festival, at a market in the old city of Sanaa, Yemen, Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

An Indonesian girl holds a balloon during Eid al-Fitr prayer that marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan on Parang Kusumo Beach in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Monday, July 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Slamet Riyadi)

An Indonesian girl holds a balloon during Eid al-Fitr prayer that marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan on Parang Kusumo Beach in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Monday, July 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Slamet Riyadi)

Muslims listen Eid al-Fitr sermons at the Lakemba Mosque in western Sydney on July 28, 2014. Thousands of Australian Muslims celebrated their religious Eid al-Fitr festival at the end of Ramadan. AFP PHOTO / Saeed Khan (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Muslims listen Eid al-Fitr sermons at the Lakemba Mosque in western Sydney on July 28, 2014. Thousands of Australian Muslims celebrated their religious Eid al-Fitr festival at the end of Ramadan. AFP PHOTO / Saeed Khan (Photo credit should read SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images)

An Egyptian child plays as Muslims pray Eid al-Fitr prayers, marking the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan at Al-Azhar mosque, the highest Islamic Sunni institution, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

An Egyptian child plays as Muslims pray Eid al-Fitr prayers, marking the end of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan at Al-Azhar mosque, the highest Islamic Sunni institution, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

 

Pakistani girls buy traditional bangles at a market ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Lahore, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

Pakistani girls buy traditional bangles at a market ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Lahore, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

A Pakistani beautician paints the hands of customers with henna ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Karachi, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

A Pakistani beautician paints the hands of customers with henna ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Karachi, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

A Pakistani beautician paints hands of customers with henna ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Karachi, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

A Pakistani beautician paints hands of customers with henna ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Karachi, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)

Kosovo Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers outside the Sultan Mehmet Fatih grand mosque during the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan in Pristina on Monday, July 28, 2014. The Eid al-Fitr, one of the holiest religious practices, is celebrated with prayers and family reunions and other festivities among Muslims all over the world. (AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu)

Kosovo Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers outside the Sultan Mehmet Fatih grand mosque during the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan in Pristina on Monday, July 28, 2014. The Eid al-Fitr, one of the holiest religious practices, is celebrated with prayers and family reunions and other festivities among Muslims all over the world. (AP Photo/Visar Kryeziu)

A Pakistani woman browses traditional bangles at a market ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Lahore, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

A Pakistani woman browses traditional bangles at a market ahead of the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, ending the fasting month of Ramadan, in Lahore, Pakistan, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

Muslim worshippers pray during the first day of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, at the Al Aqsa Mosque Compound in Jerusalem's Old City, Monday, July 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

Muslim worshippers pray during the first day of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, at the Al Aqsa Mosque Compound in Jerusalem’s Old City, Monday, July 28, 2014. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

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A Yemeni girl poses for a photograph as she attends the Eid al-Fitr prayer with her father, in Sanaa, Yemen, Monday, July 28, 2014. Monday marked the beginning of the three-day Eid al-Fitr holiday, which caps the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Muslims usually start the day with dawn prayers and visiting cemeteries to pay their respects to the dead, with children getting new clothes, shoes and haircuts, and families visiting each other. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Bahraini fishermen look at the sky where a slim crescent moon should be visible to indicate the end of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, in Malkiya village, Bahrain, Sunday, July 27, 2014. Bahrain and several other Gulf countries announced Eid will begin on Monday. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

Bahraini fishermen look at the sky where a slim crescent moon should be visible to indicate the end of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, in Malkiya village, Bahrain, Sunday, July 27, 2014. Bahrain and several other Gulf countries announced Eid will begin on Monday. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

GRESIK, JAVA, INDONESIA - JULY 27: An Indonesian Muslims uses a telescope to hold a Rukyatul Hilal to see the new crescent moon that determines the end of Ramadan at Condro Dipo Hill on July 27, 2014 in Gresik, Java, Indonesia. There was confirmed sightings of the new moon, which ends the holy month of Ramadan with the Muslims holiday Eid ul-Fitr. (Photo by Robertus Pudyanto/Getty Images)

GRESIK, JAVA, INDONESIA – JULY 27: An Indonesian Muslims uses a telescope to hold a Rukyatul Hilal to see the new crescent moon that determines the end of Ramadan at Condro Dipo Hill on July 27, 2014 in Gresik, Java, Indonesia. There was confirmed sightings of the new moon, which ends the holy month of Ramadan with the Muslims holiday Eid ul-Fitr. (Photo by Robertus Pudyanto/Getty Images)

GRESIK, JAVA, INDONESIA - JULY 27: An Indonesian Muslims speaks during a Rukyatul Hilal, to see the new crescent moon, which determines the end of Ramadan at Condro Dipo Hill on July 27, 2014 in Gresik, Java, Indonesia. There was confirmed sightings of the new moon, which ends the holy month of Ramadan with the Muslims holiday Eid ul-Fitr. (Photo by Robertus Pudyanto/Getty Images)

GRESIK, JAVA, INDONESIA – JULY 27: An Indonesian Muslims speaks during a Rukyatul Hilal, to see the new crescent moon, which determines the end of Ramadan at Condro Dipo Hill on July 27, 2014 in Gresik, Java, Indonesia. There was confirmed sightings of the new moon, which ends the holy month of Ramadan with the Muslims holiday Eid ul-Fitr. (Photo by Robertus Pudyanto/Getty Images)

 

 

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PHOTO ESSAY: Eid Al-Fitr – a celebration at the end of Ramadan

6 08 2013

One of the most joyous days in the Islamic calendar, Eid al-Fitr, also known as Eid ul-Fitr or Eid, is a celebration that marks the end of Ramadan (a holy month of fasting observed by Muslims). This year Eid al-Fitr will most likely be observed on Thursday, August 8, 2013. It is celebrated on the first day of Shawwal, the 10th month of the Islamic lunar calendar. Traditionally, the observance begins with the sighting of the new moon.

To mark the beginning of Eid and in accordance with the Sunnah, or practices of the Prophet Muhammad, many Muslims wake up early in the morning and pray Salat ul-Fajr, or the pre-dawn prayer. After brushing their teeth, taking a bath and wearing perfume, they have breakfast before heading off to perform special congregational prayers known as Salaat al-Eid. Many Muslims recite the takbir, a declaration of faith, on the way to the prayer ground and give special charitable contributions known as Zakat al-Fitr.

Eid al-Fitr is a day of great merriment and thanksgiving. Muslims celebrate by gathering with friends and family, preparing sweet delicacies, wearing new clothes, giving each other gifts and putting up lights and other decorations in their homes. A common greeting during this holiday is Eid Mubarak, which means, “Have a blessed Eid!”

Here, we round up some of the best photos of Eid 2012 celebrations across the globe.

Pakistani Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the Badshahi Masjid Mosque in Lahore on August 20, 2012. Millions of Muslims across Asia began celebrating the Eid al-Fitr holiday on August 19, with a month of fasting giving way to feasting, family reunions and raucous festivities. (Arif Ali - AFP/Getty Images)

Pakistani Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the Badshahi Masjid Mosque in Lahore on August 20, 2012. Millions of Muslims across Asia began celebrating the Eid al-Fitr holiday on August 19, with a month of fasting giving way to feasting, family reunions and raucous festivities.
(Arif Ali – AFP/Getty Images)

Pakistani Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the Badshahi Masjid Mosque on August 20, 2012. (Arif Ali - AFP/Getty Images)

Pakistani Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the Badshahi Masjid Mosque on August 20, 2012.
(Arif Ali – AFP/Getty Images)

Kashmiri Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at Hazratbal shrine in Srinagar on August 20,2012. (Rouf Bhat - AFP/Getty Images)

Kashmiri Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at Hazratbal shrine in Srinagar on August 20,2012.
(Rouf Bhat – AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian Muslim caretaker removes carpet after Eid-al-Fitr prayers at the Shahi Jama Masjid Mosque in the Walled City of Ahmedabad on August 20, 2012. (Sam Panthaky - AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian Muslim caretaker removes carpet after Eid-al-Fitr prayers at the Shahi Jama Masjid Mosque in the Walled City of Ahmedabad on August 20, 2012.
(Sam Panthaky – AFP/Getty Images)

Indian Muslim devotees offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the historic Taj Mahal in Agra on August 20, 2012. (Strdel - AFP/Getty Images)

Indian Muslim devotees offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the historic Taj Mahal in Agra on August 20, 2012. (Strdel – AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian street vendor sells food to Muslim faithful after Eid al-Fitr prayers near the Jama Masjid Mosque in the old quarters of New Delhi on August 20, 2012. (Roberto Schmidt - AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian street vendor sells food to Muslim faithful after Eid al-Fitr prayers near the Jama Masjid Mosque in the old quarters of New Delhi on August 20, 2012.
(Roberto Schmidt – AFP/Getty Images)

A Muslim family prays on the first day of Eid al-Fitr at Niu Jie Mosque to celebrate Eid al-Fitr on August 19, 2012 in Beijing, China. (Lintao Zhang - AFP/Getty Images)

A Muslim family prays on the first day of Eid al-Fitr at Niu Jie Mosque to celebrate Eid al-Fitr on August 19, 2012 in Beijing, China.
(Lintao Zhang – AFP/Getty Images)

Indian Muslims stop to enjoy traditional sweets after offering Eid al-Fitr prayers in Kolkata on August 20, 2012. (Dibyangshu Sarkar - AFP/Getty Images)

Indian Muslims stop to enjoy traditional sweets after offering Eid al-Fitr prayers in Kolkata on August 20, 2012.
(Dibyangshu Sarkar – AFP/Getty Images)

Indian Muslims stop to enjoy traditional sweets after offering Eid al-Fitr prayers in Kolkata on August 20, 2012. (Dibyangshu Sarkar - AFP/Getty Images)

Indian Muslims stop to enjoy traditional sweets after offering Eid al-Fitr prayers in Kolkata on August 20, 2012.
(Dibyangshu Sarkar – AFP/Getty Images)

Bangladeshi Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the National Mosque of Bangladesh, Baitul Mukarram in Dhaka on August 20, 2012. (Munir Uz Zaman - AFP/Getty Images)

Bangladeshi Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the National Mosque of Bangladesh, Baitul Mukarram in Dhaka on August 20, 2012.
(Munir Uz Zaman – AFP/Getty Images)

Young Muslim girls show their hands decorated with henna after attending prayers on Eid Al-Fitr at the Regent's Park Mosque in London on August 19, 2012. (Adek Berry - AFP/Getty Images)

Young Muslim girls show their hands decorated with henna after attending prayers on Eid Al-Fitr at the Regent’s Park Mosque in London on August 19, 2012.
(Adek Berry – AFP/Getty Images)

Filipino Muslim women gather to pray celebrating the start of Eid al-Fitr in Manila on August 19, 2012. (Noel Celis - AFP/Getty Images)

Filipino Muslim women gather to pray celebrating the start of Eid al-Fitr in Manila on August 19, 2012.
(Noel Celis – AFP/Getty Images)

Sri Lankan Muslims wash before prayers during Eid al-Fitr celebrations at the Galle Face esplanade in Colombo on August 19, 2012. (Ishara S. Kodikara - AFP/Getty Images)

Sri Lankan Muslims wash before prayers during Eid al-Fitr celebrations at the Galle Face esplanade in Colombo on August 19, 2012.
(Ishara S. Kodikara – AFP/Getty Images)

A Muslim boy prays at the start of Eid al-Fitr at the Peace and Friendship stadium in Piraeus near Athens on August 19, 2012. (Louisa Gouliamaki - AFP/Getty Images)

A Muslim boy prays at the start of Eid al-Fitr at the Peace and Friendship stadium in Piraeus near Athens on August 19, 2012.
(Louisa Gouliamaki – AFP/Getty Images)





Ramadan: Muslim month of fasting and prayer

9 07 2013

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Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and a time when Muslims across the world will fast during the hours of daylight.

Ramadan is the fourth of the five pillars of Islam.

The Qur’an was first revealed to the Prophet Muhammad during this month. The actual night that the Qur’an was revealed is a night known as Lailut ul-Qadr (‘The Night of Power’).

How do Muslims keep Ramadan?

Almost all Muslims try to give up bad habits during Ramadan, and some will try to become better Muslims by praying more or reading the Qur’an.

Many Muslims will attempt to read the whole of the Qur’an at least once during the Ramadan period. Many will also attend special services in Mosques during which the Qur’an is read.

Fasting is intended to help teach Muslims self-discipline, self-restraint and generosity. It also reminds them of the suffering of the poor, who may rarely get to eat well.

It is common to have one meal (known as the suhoor), just before sunrise and another (known as the iftar), directly after sunset.

Because Ramadan is a time to spend with friends and family, the fast will often be broken by different Muslim families coming together to share in an evening meal.

Eid ul Fitr

The end of Ramadan is marked by a big celebration called ‘Eid-ul-Fitr’, the Festival of the Breaking of the Fast.

Muslims are not only celebrating the end of fasting, but thanking Allah for the help and strength that he gave them throughout the previous month to help them practise self-control.

The festival begins when the first sight of the new moon is seen in the sky.

There are special services out of doors and in Mosques, processions through the streets, and of course, a special celebratory meal – eaten during daytime, the first daytime meal Muslims will have had in a month.

Eid is also a time of forgiveness, and making amends.

During Eid-ul-Fitr Muslims dress in their finest clothes, give gifts to children and spend time with their friends and family.

At Eid it is obligatory to give a set amount of money to charity to be used to help poor people buy new clothes and food so they too can celebrate.

In the name of Central-European Religious Freedom Institute, I wish Ramadan Mubarak to all Muslim believers.

Jura Nanuk,
Founder & President

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Eid ul-Fitr: Muslim holiday marking the end of Ramadan, the month of fasting

30 08 2011

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, which lasts 29 or 30 days. It is the Islamic month of fasting, in which participating Muslims refrain from eating, drinking, smoking and sex with their partners during daylight hours and is intended to teach Muslims about patience, spirituality, humility and submissiveness to God.

Ramadan is a time of spiritual reflection and worship. Muslims are expected to put more effort into following the teachings of Islam and to avoid obscene and irreligious sights and sounds. During fasting, intercourse is prohibited as well as eating and drinking, and resistance of all temptations is encouraged. Purity of both thoughts and actions is important. The act of fasting is said to redirect the heart away from worldly activities, its purpose being to cleanse the inner soul and free it from harm. It also teaches Muslims to practice self-discipline, self-control, sacrifice, and empathy for those who are less fortunate, thus encouraging actions of generosity and charity.

Eid ul-Fitr, often abbreviated to Eid, is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan. Common greetings during this holiday are the Arabic greeting ‘Eid Mubārak (“Blessed Eid”) or ‘Eid Sa‘eed (“Happy Eid”). Muslims are also encouraged on this day to forgive and forget any differences or past animosities that may have occurred with others during the year.

In the name of Central-European Religious Freedom Institute, I wish Eid Mubarak to all Muslim believers.

Jura Nanuk,
President of the Committee for Inter-Religious Cooperation








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